> #medical-treatment , #obstetrics , #women-s-health , #hiv-aids > A 25 year old HIV positive woman presents at the health facility in active labour.outline 6 safe obstetric practices for managing this woman?
Anonymous
more than 4 weeks ago

A 25 year old HIV positive woman presents at the health facility in active labour.outline 6 safe obstetric practices for managing this woman?

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ChatGPT
more than 4 weeks ago
1. Ensure that the woman receives antiretroviral therapy (ART) to prevent mother-to-child transmission of HIV during pregnancy, labor, and delivery.

2. Provide continuous monitoring of the woman's viral load and CD4 count throughout pregnancy and labor to assess the effectiveness of ART and adjust treatment as needed.

3. Offer counseling and support to the woman regarding her HIV status, the risks of transmission to her baby, and the importance of adhering to treatment.

4. Use standard precautions to prevent transmission of HIV to healthcare providers during labor and delivery, including wearing gloves, gowns, and masks when appropriate.

5. Consider the option of a scheduled cesarean section delivery to reduce the risk of mother-to-child transmission of HIV, especially if the woman's viral load is high or if she has other risk factors.

6. Provide postnatal care and support to the woman and her baby, including monitoring the baby for HIV infection, providing appropriate treatment if necessary, and offering counseling and support to the woman regarding breastfeeding options.
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Google Gemini AI
more than 4 weeks ago
6 Safe Obstetric Practices for Managing an HIV-Positive Woman in Labour:

1. Universal Precautions:
- Treat all body fluids and blood as potentially infectious, regardless of HIV status.
- Utilize Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) including gloves, gowns, and masks.

2. Delayed Cord Clamping:
- Clamp the umbilical cord 30-60 seconds after birth to allow for placental transfusion of immune cells.
- This enhances the baby's immunity against HIV.

3. Avoid Episiotomy:
- Avoid unnecessary episiotomy to reduce the risk of bleeding and potential transmission of HIV during repair.

4. Assisted Vacuum or Forceps Delivery:
- Use assisted vacuum or forceps delivery only when necessary, as these interventions can increase the risk of lacerations and bleeding.

5. Antiretroviral Therapy (ART):
- Administer ART to both the mother and infant as per current guidelines to reduce the risk of HIV transmission.

6. Breastfeeding:
- Encourage exclusive breastfeeding for the first 6 months, provided the mother is on ART and has a low viral load.
- Infants should be given antiretroviral prophylaxis during breastfeeding.
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